There Were Giants in Those Days: Codex Robertsonianus, Part 2

Daniel B. Wallace

In my previous post about the correspondence between Adolf Deissmann and A. T. Robertson concerning a Greek Gospels manuscript, I showed the pictures of Deissmann’s first letter, along with a transcription of it.

This is the second of four parts of that correspondence. These letters constitute the A. T. Robertson Papers, Box 7, Folder 3, Archives and Special Collections, James P. Boyce Centennial Library, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky. I am grateful to Adam Winters, archivist at SBTS, who provided the photographs. They are used with permission of the SBTS Archives & Special Collections.

Deissmann to Robertson_2 Apr 1927

Professor Dr. Adolf Deissmann
Berlin-Wilmersdorf, Prinzregentenstrasse 6., April 2nd., 1927.

My dear friend Robertson:

I thank you very much for your kind letter of March 19., which I received to-day. Well: I hold the Tetra-Evangelium at your disposal and deposited it for you in my banker’s safe. Perhaps it may be possible…

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There Were Giants in Those Days: Codex Robertsonianus, Part 3

Daniel B. Wallace

In my previous posts about the correspondence between Adolf Deissmann and A. T. Robertson concerning a Greek Gospels manuscript, I showed the pictures of Deissmann’s first and second letters, along with a transcription of them.

This is the third of four parts of that correspondence. These letters constitute the A. T. Robertson Papers, Box 7, Folder 3, Archives and Special Collections, James P. Boyce Centennial Library, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louisville, Kentucky. I am grateful to Adam Winters, archivist at SBTS, who provided the photographs. They are used with permission of the SBTS Archives & Special Collections.

Deissmann to Robertson_30 May 1927_page 1 of 2

Professor Dr. Adolf Deissmann
Berlin-Wilmersdorf, Prinzregentenstrasse 6., May 30th., 1927.

My dear Dr. Robertson:

Some days ago I received your kind letter of May 10, 1927 and the enclosed draft. Best thanks. Imediately [sic] I sent the Codex to your address by one of our best Berlin forwarding offices (Edmund Franzkowiak…

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You have wondered about Jesus and His relation to God—John G. Lake

John Graham Lake 1870-1935

John Graham Lake
1870-1935

You have wondered about Jesus and His relation to God, and you wonder how Jesus Christ could be the Son of God and be God. Supposing that part of me that was over there in Wales and was able to take in all these things had stayed there. Supposing it had decided to take on itself a body and remain in Wales. What relation would it be to me? It would be born out of my nature. It would be part of myself. I believe God gave me that experience to settle forever in my soul that question of Jesus Christ and His relation to God the Father. And Jesus, though being one with the Father, still maintained His own individuality, and it is no longer a problem to my soul.

I want to tell you that Jesus Christ came out of the soul of God and He came to the world and gave His blood for you and me. And when Jesus gave His blood for you and me, beloved, it was God that did it to my soul, Jesus is not the Son of God  in that He is separate and detached from God. He is God. His blood was the life of the heart of God. It was God’s manifestation of His divine affection for the world He had created.

I would rather face any other thing in all God’s eternity than to face that Lord who loved me with such a passion that He shed His blood for me and I had been negligent and thoughtless about it. Brethren, we owe Him a duty that we can never know.

John G. Lake: The complete collection of his Life Teachings; Whitaker House 1999, page 421

 

Review of Lexham Discourse Greek New Testament Bundle (Logos Bible Software)

Daniel B. Wallace

As would be expected from anything produced by Steven Runge, this is a most useful tool. It is intended to help readers understand why an author chooses the forms he does to convey meaning. Discourse grammar has become an increasingly helpful approach in the last few years to supplement standard grammars. It does not replace traditional grammars, but supplements them. Occasionally, discourse grammars, including this one from Logos, will see meaning in the wrong places. For example, the illustration of the use of the participle like an indicative verb conveying some meaning that is somehow different from an indicative may be overplayed (repeatedly mentioned in the Introduction). The participle used as an indicative verb is quite rare in the NT, never seems to occur in classical Greek, and is most likely due to Semitic influence. Most of the NT examples occur in the Apocalypse, a book whose author R. H…

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There Were Giants in Those Days: Codex Robertsonianus (Gregory-Aland 2358), Part 1

Daniel B. Wallace

In 1927, Adolf Deissmann began a correspondence with A. T. Robertson that led to the purchase of a Greek Gospels manuscript by Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Some of the story of this manuscript’s travels and text is told by John W. Bowman in his 23-page booklet (with four plates), The Robertson Codex (Allahabad, India: Mission Press, 1928). The booklet was a reprinting of articles in The Indian Standard 139, nos. 8 and 9 (August and September, 1928). Bowman had been a student of Robertson’s at Southern and later became professor of New Testament and Church History at North India United Theological College in Saharanpur, India.

In Bowman’s booklet are two chapters, which correspond to the two articles in The Indian Standard. The first chapter addresses the process of photographing the manuscript, and is a window on the difficulties that attended such labors in the 1920s. It took the author nearly…

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from Simply Christianity –by N.T. Wright

ntwrightJesus was always going to parties where people had plenty
to eat and drink and there seemed to be a celebration going
on. He often grossly exaggerated to make his point: here
you are, he said, trying to take a speck out of your
friend’s eye, when you’ve got a huge great plank in your
own eye! He gave his followers, especially the leading
ones, funny nicknames (“Peter” means “Rocky”; James and
John he called “Thunder-boys”). Wherever he went, people
were excited because they believed that God was on the
move, that a new rescue operation was in the air, that
things were going to be put right. People in that mood are
like old friends meeting up at the start of a holiday.They
tend to laugh a lot. There is a good time coming. The
celebration has begun.jesus laughing_Jesus

Equally, wherever Jesus went he met an endless supply of
people whose lives had gone badly wrong. Sick people, sad
people, people in doubt, people in despair, people covering
up their uncertainties with arrogant bluster, people using
religion as a screen against harsh reality. And though
Jesus healed many of them, it wasn’t like someone simply
waving a magic wand. He shared the pain. He was deeply
grieved at the sight of a leper and the thought of all that
the man had gone through. He wept at the tomb of a close
friend. Toward the end of the story, he himself was in
agony, agony of soul before he faced the same agony in his
body.

Wright, N. T.. Simply Christian: Why Christianity Makes
Sense (p. 11). HarperCollins. Kindle Edition.

 

Kris Vallotton “Moving from Denominationalism to Apostleships” – YouTube

Kris VKris Vallotton “Moving from Denominationalism to Apostleships” – YouTube.

Kris Vallotton is the author of Heavy Rain where you can find a further discussion of Denominationalism to Apostleship.