What is the correct behavior with regard to the human embryo from an ethical point of view?

St. John One: One

According to the needs of human rationality (therefore with no reference to Revelation, to which “moral theology” refers), the correct behavior with regard to the human embryo can be considered moral only if and in the measure in which it conforms to the human embryo’s nature or to his identity in the sense that it respects it and never contradicts it. Since the “nature” or the embryo’s own identity is that of a human being, the behavior with regard to the human embryo is only moral if and in the measure in which it considers and treats the human embryo like a human being, like any other human being. Moreover, since the human embryo is a human being from fertilization, this is the correct behavior from the very moment of the human embryo’s fertilization.

Identity and Status of the Human Embryo:The Center for Bioethics of the Catholic University of the…

View original post 4,238 more words

Revisiting the argument from fetal potential | Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine | by Bertha Alvarez Manninen

14031784874_535098b38a_k-998x666

One of the most famous, and most derided, arguments against the morality of abortion is the argument from potential, which maintains that the fetus’ potential to become a person and enjoy the valuable life common to persons, entails that its destruction is prima facie morally impermissible. In this paper, I will revisit and offer a defense of the argument from potential. First, I will criticize the classical arguments proffered against the importance of fetal potential, specifically the arguments put forth by philosophers Peter Singer and David Boonin, by carefully unpacking the claims made in these arguments and illustrating why they are flawed. Secondly, I will maintain that fetal potential is morally relevant when it comes to the morality of abortion, but that it must be accorded a proper place in the argument. This proper place, however, cannot be found until we first answer a very important and complex question: we must first address the issue of personal identity, and when the fetus becomes the type of being who is relevantly identical to a future person. I will illustrate why the question of fetal potential can only be meaningfully addressed after we have first answered the question of personal identity and how it relates to the human fetus.

Source: Revisiting the argument from fetal potential | Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine | Full Text

Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine20072:7

https://doi.org/10.1186/1747-5341-2-7

The Second American Revolutionary/Civil War, Part 5 by Rick Joyner | MorningStar Word for the Week 2019

  In the dream that I was given about the “Second American Revolutionary/Civil War,” the first part was about the strategy for this war. The symbolism may seem odd, but if you stick with me for a little bit, it gives important insights into what we must do now.

Source: The Second American Revolutionary/Civil War, Part 5 by Rick Joyner | MorningStar Word for the Week 2019

Sorting it Out — A Pastor’s Thoughts

I have been asked to tell you what Christians believe, and I am going to begin by telling you one thing that Christians do not need to believe. If you are a Christian you do not have to believe that all the other religions are simply wrong all through. If you are an atheist you […]

via Sorting it Out — A Pastor’s Thoughts